Christmas Shopping - La Fête de Noué

Christmas shopping is heralded by La Fête dé Noué in Jersey with a spectacular of festive events in the capital town of St Helier.

La Fête de Noué

The event name translates from the old Norman-French language and means ‘Christmas Festival’.

The early sprinkling of seasonal magic ensures that visitors and locals can enjoy night parades, dazzling lights, festive films, street theatre, open air carol concerts and ice skating.

Visitors can also shop at the special food and craft markets brimming over with festive treats and thoughtful gifts in the lead up to the big day.

Christmas shopping breaks in Jersey mean fun and festivities in addition to the huge variety of artisan outdoor markets.

You can make the most of the late night shop openings, key high street favourites and independent boutiques. All minus the VAT of course!

Jersey’s shops are also open on Sundays (a special occurrence reserved for the month of December).

In the lead up to Christmas, when it’s time to put those bags down and your feet up for a well deserved glass of something, there are plenty of cafes and bars to choose from.

Jersey Air Show

Arguably one of Europe’s finest free aviation festivals, the Jersey Air Show has continued to attract and delight tens of thousands of Islanders since its

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Jersey Marathon

Now established as a niche event, the Standard Chartered Jersey Marathon is home to a variety of runner types. From those set on personal challenges.

Read More »

Jersey Rally

We’re delighted to report that the Hotel de France was one of the sponsors whose logo featured on the winning car of this year’s Jersey

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Jersey Rally

We’re delighted to report that the Hotel de France was one of the sponsors whose logo featured on the winning car of this year’s Jersey Rally. A key highlight in the Island’s sporting calendar.

Jersey Rally

The ‘Major Motorsport’ Mitsubishi, driven by Simon Mauger with navigator Brian Cammack, finished with a total time of 2:11:01.8. And just a mere few seconds ahead of their closest competitors. It’s the sixth time that Jersey born Mauger has won the rally.

Heralding from across the Channels Islands and the UK. The competing drivers take their cars screaming through Jersey’s leafy green lanes at speeds of up to 140 mph. High adrenaline action for all those watching and cheering them on. But the origins of the sport are a little more sedate!

 

How the rally got started

The first Jersey rally took place over 80 years ago in December 1935. All 33 entries set off for almost a Sunday afternoon drive as the local paper reported:

“The rally will consist of ten to twelve driving tests. The nature of these tests will be such that motorists with one or two years’ experience of driving should find little difficulty in passing them.”

Fast forward some forty years to the late 1970s. The Jersey Motorcycle and Light Car Club held a Daffodil Rally which involved roads closed in our Eastern parishes. A few months later a Spring session saw cars taking on the roads of the rugged North coast.

These races generated a lot of interest in the local community. Inspiring hope that something similar could become a regular fixture. The move got blocked because of a misunderstanding of what a rally actually entailed. The governmental person in charge at the time thought it was more akin to a scavenger hunt!

The Jersey Rally now attracts more than 170 drivers

The idea of a full rally was suspended for another five years. Until some keen and persistent enthusiasts got together with a detailed plan that was finally approved. This resulted in the first Jersey Rally, as we know it today, staged in late October 1983. And since then, the scale of the event has grown both in the number of stages and competitors taking part.

The current two day and night stage weekend format was introduced in the mid-90s. Each year, the event draws over 170 drivers and navigators. The same number of support crew. Around 300 course marshals. 100 or so officials and scores of spectators all join in the exciting autumn weekend of rallying.

Find out more about this annual event here.

Jersey Air Show

Arguably one of Europe’s finest free aviation festivals, the Jersey Air Show has continued to attract and delight tens of thousands of Islanders since its

Read More »

Jersey Marathon

Now established as a niche event, the Standard Chartered Jersey Marathon is home to a variety of runner types. From those set on personal challenges.

Read More »

Jersey Rally

We’re delighted to report that the Hotel de France was one of the sponsors whose logo featured on the winning car of this year’s Jersey

Read More »
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LinkedIn

Book direct for our best rate

Jersey Marathon

Now established as a niche event, the Standard Chartered Jersey Marathon is home to a variety of runner types. From those set on personal challenges. Others who are raising money for charity. And high profile elite athletes competing for prizes and honour.

Jersey Marathon

The event starts and finishes in the heart of Jersey’s town St. Helier. The route takes runners via many stunning scenic views. Along country lanes and past breath-taking coastal vistas in the Western parishes.

An enjoyable challenge for beginners and experienced competitors, the race divided into three categories. Marathon, Relay Race and 3K Fun Run. Last year, the Jersey Marathon attracted over 2,500 entrants with over 60% of registered runners visiting the Island.

With such a high number of visitors, the Jersey Marathon organisers have always been keen to promote the event. There are many initiatives such as the carb loading ‘pasta party’ the night before. These take place to encourage people to meet each other – and size up the competition!

The whole route is lined with cheering spectators. Making crossing that finish line in Jersey is a special occasion. Expect large crowds and a full media presence all applauding entrants on. Runners can expect a thunderous reception as they complete the course.

A little marathon history

The history of the marathon may have ancient roots. But the race’s official length of 26.2 miles wasn’t established until the 20th century. And likely at the instigation of the British royal family?

The first organized marathon was in Athens at the start of the modern era of the Olympic Games in 1896. Before this, the sporting event (held only in Greece from around 776 B.C. to A.D. 393), didn’t feature such long-distance races.

The idea to include it in the late 19th century was inspired by the legend of an ancient Greek messenger who raced from the site of Marathon to Athens. A distance of almost 25 miles (40kms) – with the news of an important Greek victory over an invading army of Persians.

After making his announcement, the exhausted messenger collapsed and died. To commemorate his dramatic run, the distance of the Olympic marathon was set at 40 kms in 1896.

For the next few Olympics, the length of the marathon remained close to 25 miles. Then, as part of the 1908 Games in London, the course was allegedly extended to accommodate the wishes of the Crown.

It’s said that King Edward V11 and Queen Alexandra requested that the race should start on the lawn of Windsor Castle. This was so that their children could watch from the window of their nursery. The race would finish in front of the Royal Box at the Olympic stadium in West London. With a distance that happened to be 26.2 miles (26 miles and 385 yards). This random boost in mileage ending up sticking. In 1921, the length for a marathon was standardized at 26.2 miles (42.19 kms).

How to recover after the Jersey Marathon

After months of training and a long marathon run, how to recover should then become your priority. Lots of runners make the mistake of not taking time to recover. But after all the training and effort on race day, the body needs to rest.

For a dedicated runner, taking a week off may seem counter productive and there maybe a fear of losing the hard earned gains. But the reality is that not taking time to recover can lead to over training and possible injuries. Also, resting for a week will have little adverse impact on your fitness.

Start your marathon recovery on the right foot.

Immediately after your run, it recommended to take a short stroll. This will act as a cool down and keep your blood flowing – aiding muscle tissue repair. Also, eat some fruit, energy bars or sports drinks providing vitamins and restoring blood sugar levels.

Try to get back to where you are staying as soon as possible. Soak in an ice bath or cold pool for approximately 15 minutes. Then relax.

In the days following, try to consume lots of fruit, carbohydrates and protein. The carbs and protein will help repair the muscles. The fruits will help repair the immune system and replenish Vitamin C.

Soak in a hot and cold pool for alternate 5 minute intervals. This temperature contrast bathing helps blood flow in and out of the muscles and promotes healing.

A light massage at this stage will help loosen the muscles. But refrain from deep tissue massage at this stage. If you have problem areas or injury after 3 to 4 days, this is the time for deep tissue massage.

Towards the latter part of the 7 day recovery is a good time to return to some gentle running. Building back into full training over the period of 14 to 21 days.

Do not be concerned with losing running ability or fitness. It is far more important to ensure proper recovery and come back fitter and stronger from the marathon.

Where to Recover

Many local sporting athletes use Ayush Wellness Spa for the pre and post activity recovery. The spa is a perfect environment for relaxation and includes a sauna and steam room. Within the spa complex is a variety of massage pools, including a 36° hot pool and 8° cold pool ideal for contrast bathing recovery. The spa also offers a range of massage therapies.

Complimentary use of Ayush Spa when you stay with us

Ayush Spa is situated here at Hotel de France. So if you are visting Jersey for the marathon and book your accommodation with us, we can offer you complimentary use of the spa facilities.

Browse the site for more information. Book online for our best rates or contact us to check availability and discuss requirements.

Visit the official website to find out more about the Standard Chartered Jersey Marathon.

Jersey Air Show

Arguably one of Europe’s finest free aviation festivals, the Jersey Air Show has continued to attract and delight tens of thousands of Islanders since its

Read More »

Jersey Marathon

Now established as a niche event, the Standard Chartered Jersey Marathon is home to a variety of runner types. From those set on personal challenges.

Read More »

Jersey Rally

We’re delighted to report that the Hotel de France was one of the sponsors whose logo featured on the winning car of this year’s Jersey

Read More »
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Google+
Twitter
LinkedIn

Book direct for our best rate

Jersey Air Show

Arguably one of Europe’s finest free aviation festivals, the Jersey Air Show has continued to attract and delight tens of thousands of Islanders since its debut some 64 years ago. Additionally it’s now become an extremely popular island event with visitors from all over Europe.

Jersey Air Show

Thousands head to our shores to watch modern and vintage military and civilian international aircrafts flying in from countries such as Belgium, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States.

How the air display began

The skies above Jersey have enjoyed an annual air display since 1952 when the event was known as the Battle of Britain Air Display.  Today it remains an iconic commemoration of the three-month air battle fought between Germany and Britain in the first year of the Second World War.

Beginning on 7 September 1940, British cities and strategic defences were specifically targeted by the German Luftwaffe which had been commanded by Hitler to destroy The Royal Air Force. Despite heavy bombing raids which saw horrific loss of life, the British morale had not been broken and so the most the most concentrated large scale aerial battle over London took place on 15 September 1940. There were over 1,500 planes in the skies that night fighting fiercely and, at dawn, the RAF Fighter Command defeated the German attackers. Today we remember this week as Battle of Britain Week.

Many historians view this victory as a key turning point in the Allies’ favour and it gave rise to Sir Winston Churchill’s famous quote: “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

With the exception of 1954, the air display has been held every September since 1951. The event was renamed The Jersey International Air Display in 1997 to welcome more worldwide involvement, and it now features international aircraft as well as traditional RAF planes.

Beautiful Spectator Location

Each year, the organising team of the Jersey air show always strives to incorporate something different. They focus their efforts on both the breath taking choreography that takes place in the skies or on the two major static displays where you can get up close and personal to the aircraft and perhaps have a chat with some of the pilots and crew.

The curved stretch of St. Aubin’s Bay, an impressive natural amphitheatre with the historic Elizabeth Castle set in the backdrop, is the stage for the display itself and there are a number of key vantage points in this area to watch the afternoon’s air show.

Pilots and aircraft

Traditional highlights include Lancaster, Spitfire and Hurricane aircraft forming a Battle of Britain Memorial Flight to then be joined by daring acrobatic aerial teams such as the RAF Tucano Display Team and wing walking teams such as Aerosuperbatics. The ever-favourite Royal Air Force Red Arrows always finish the afternoon with a dazzling display leaving their famous red, white and blue smoke trailing in the sky.

Any profits from this Jersey Air Show are donated in support of British Services charities.

Visit the official website for more information about this year’s air display.

Jersey Air Show

Arguably one of Europe’s finest free aviation festivals, the Jersey Air Show has continued to attract and delight tens of thousands of Islanders since its

Read More »

Jersey Marathon

Now established as a niche event, the Standard Chartered Jersey Marathon is home to a variety of runner types. From those set on personal challenges.

Read More »

Jersey Rally

We’re delighted to report that the Hotel de France was one of the sponsors whose logo featured on the winning car of this year’s Jersey

Read More »
Facebook
Google+
Twitter
LinkedIn

Book direct for our best rate

Jersey Battle of Flowers

As traditional and iconic as our famous Jersey cows, the annual Jersey Battle of Flowers celebration is one of our oldest and best loved Island events enjoyed by locals and holidaymakers alike

Jersey Battle of Flowers

If you’ve ever wanted to see a six metre high family of tigers or witness the magical world of with Alice in Wonderland or perhaps thought about climbing on board Captain Hook’s pirate ship, Battle day is when dreams come alive.

Where the Jersey Battle of Flowers started

The festival’s origins date back over a century ago when Islanders wanted to celebrate the coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra and decided to stage a one off parade on the 9 August 1902. It was such a success that the organisers decided to stage it again the following year and thus began a summer tradition which has carried on to this very day. In fact, there have only been two periods since when large world events meant understandably that there was no battle – the Great War of 1914-1918 and similarly during the Second World War when indeed Jersey was occupied by the Nazi regime. It was only in 1951 that some local businessmen decided that a reinstatement and revival of the Battle would bring a much needed community focus and also be an attraction for Jersey’s growing tourism industry.

How this floral carnival got its name

Back in the very early days, the floral floats were horse drawn and the tradition at the time, to encourage a bit of ‘audience participation’, was for flowers and petals to be torn off and thrown into the crowd – particularly at the ladies – in the hope that they would be thrown back! This practise was stopped in 1964 as things could often get a bit unruly and of course there would be the clean-up operation afterwards to think about.

The battle became and island wide competition

Over the years as Jersey Battle of Flowers grew, so did the types of floats and of course the horses have been replaced by carefully hidden motorised machinery. Spurred on by a bit of healthy competitive rivalry, these days the floats produced by each of Jersey’s 12 parishes (and other local groups, schools and even families) have become more and more sophisticated in their creative design, animation and motorisation. Ideas and concepts are brainstormed at the beginning of each year and then people of all ages and work tirelessly for many months bringing everything to life. All the fresh flowers need to be cut and cooled and so the evening before is the most critical point as this is when they are glued onto the floats. Creations can be over 45 foot in length and, as part of the competition rules, every part must be meticulously covered in flower heads. The flowers used are predominantly chrysanthemums brought in from the UK and Holland as well as locally grown asters and dried flowers and hares tails are also applied to create the intricate designs and patterns. As this is competition with the highly sought after and coveted accolade of Prix d’Honneur, each float remains a huge closely kept secret until Battle day itself when they head through the country lanes in the very early hours of the morning onto Victoria Avenue ready for the festivities to start. And later that afternoon with the time-honoured cry of ‘Let Battle Commence!’, the spectacular works of art are revealed to the spectators who have lined the streets to enjoy the carnival atmosphere. Dancers, bands, majorettes and street entertainers all lead the way and are focussed on getting the party started by having a great time themselves.

Miss Battle of Flowers

Each year, there is also an Island wide pageant to select a Miss Battle who gets to ride on her own specially designed float. In 2016, this honour will go to Aimee Le Brun who will be accompanied by musical theatre star, Joe McElderry and Miss Junior Battle of Flowers, 11 year old Lucy-Anne Richford. What’s more, there is an enchanting night-time Moonlight Parade to enjoy the following evening when the floats are shown again this time all illuminated by thousands of small colourful lights. This is the opportunity for the exhibitors to let their hair down after all their hard work and dance under the stars with everyone before the festival ends with a breath taking fireworks display.

Now one of the largest floral carnivals in Europe

The Jersey Battle of Flowers is now of the largest floral carnivals in Europe and truly one of Jersey’s best loved celebrations. Undoubtedly a highlight for the summer calendar for everyone on the Island so come see for yourselves and join in the fun!

Details of this year’s event

Visit the official website for dates, tickets and more information about this year’s Jersey Battle of Flowers.

Jersey Air Show

Arguably one of Europe’s finest free aviation festivals, the Jersey Air Show has continued to attract and delight tens of thousands of Islanders since its

Read More »

Jersey Marathon

Now established as a niche event, the Standard Chartered Jersey Marathon is home to a variety of runner types. From those set on personal challenges.

Read More »

Jersey Rally

We’re delighted to report that the Hotel de France was one of the sponsors whose logo featured on the winning car of this year’s Jersey

Read More »
Facebook
Google+
Twitter
LinkedIn

Book direct for our best rate